timeline


marian anderson

In 1959, Princeton University confers the Doctor of Humanities honorary degree upon opera singer Marian Anderson, making her the first African American woman to receive such an honor from the college.

image: time.com


t’sai-ying cheng

In 1964, Princeton awards a Ph.D degree to a woman, T’sai-ying Cheng, for the first time. In the same year, Princeton ends compulsory chapel for freshmen.

image: Steve Bloch/Black Star


admission

In 1969, Princeton first admits women as undergraduates. 148 women, consisting of 100 freshwomen and transfer students of other years, enter Princeton on September 6, amidst a frenzy of media ogling and ribbing.

Image: Life Magazine


founding

The Women*s Center and Third World Center (now Carl A. Fields Center) are founded. This same year, Swann v. Charlotte Mecklenburg makes the busing of students for the purpose of promoting integration in public schools constitutional. This case was suggestive of how the nation was still grappling with the implementation of the Brown v. Board of Education decision.

image: daily princetonian


athletics

In the fall of 1971, the University creates a women’s varsity intercollegiate sports program that allows intramural teams to compete formally with other schools. The teams includes field hockey, tennis, squash, and crew. Princetonian women quickly demonstrate that they were willing and able to compete; several newspapers, including a feature in the New York Times, discuss the achievements of the women’s crew and tennis teams.

image: Office of Communications Records


vera marcus

In 1972, Vera Marcus becomes the first undergraduate African American woman to graduate from the college as a “Princetonian.”

images: Mudd Manuscript Library


title ix

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 bans discrimination on the basis of gender.

image: women’s sports foundation
featuring: patsy t. mink


lgbt

In 1972, undergraduate students form the Gay Alliance at Princeton for gay, lesbian, and bisexual students. In 2005, Princeton launches the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Center.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


engineers

In 1973, the Society of Women Engineers is founded by thirteen of the 17 women majoring in engineering.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


affirmative action

In 1974, a group of Princeton’s Puerto Rican and Chicano students, which included Sonia Sotomayor, petitions the Office of Health, Education, and Welfare to review the college’s Affirmative Action policy—particularly what the students charge are Princeton’s deficiencies in addressing the concerns of Puerto Rican and Chicano students. Thereafter, Sotomayor goes on to propose the first student- initiated seminar on the history and politics of Puerto-Rico to be administered in the spring of 1974.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


valedictorian

In 1975, women are named valedictorian (Cynthia Chase ’75) and salutatorian (Lisa Siegman ’75) for the first time.

Image: Daily Princetonian


jill pilgrim

In 1977, Jill Pilgrim becomes the first women’s track athlete to be a Heptagonal Games first-team performer and the first black woman in League history in any sport to become first team.

Image: Daily Princetonian


dean

In 1977, Joan Girgus becomes the first woman to be named Dean of the College. She served in this role till 1987. Nina Garsoian served as dean of the Graduate School from 1977 to 1979.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


sally frank

In 1979, Sally Frank ’80 files a sex discrimination suit against all-male eating clubs.

IMAGE: PRINCETON ALUMNI WEEKLY


ROTC

In 1980, Kimberlee Thompson ’81 becomes Princeton’s first female ROTC cadet commander.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


women’s studies

In 1982, the Program in Women’s Studies is established with Nancy Malkiel (then Nancy Weiss), as its first interim director.

Image: Daily Princetonian


SHARE

In 1987, SHARE (Sexual Harasment/Assault Advising, Resources and Education) is founded. The first annual Take Back the Night march is held that year.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


standing committee

In 1989, the Standing Committee on the Status of Women is established to focus on issues such as work-life resources and the recruitment and retention of women.

IMAGE: PRINCETON WEEKLY BULLETIN


eating clubs

In 1990, Sally Frank ’80 wins her suit and all eating clubs became co-ed. Tiger Inn, the last of the all-male eating clubs, admits women in 1991.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


toni morrison

In 1993, Toni Morrison, who had been part of the Princeton faculty since 1989, is awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


amy gutmann

In 1995, Amy Gutmann is named Dean of the Faculty and served in this role till 1997. She later served as provost from 2000 to 2004, and she remains the only woman who has held both positions.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


shirley tilghman

In 2001, Shirley M. Tilghman is named president of the University. She was the first woman to hold this office and served till 2013.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


1:1

In 2002, the number of male and female undergraduates becomes roughly equal. However, there were 111 tenured women on the faculty out of 538 full-time tenured faculty.


maria klawe

From 2003 to 2006, Maria Klawe, a computer scientist and former dean of science at the University of British Columbia, serves as the dean of Princeton’s School of Engineering and Applied Science.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


anne-marie slaughter

In 2003, Anne-Marie Slaughter becomes the first woman to be named dean of Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


sonia sotomayor

In 2009, Sonia M. Sotomayor ’76 becomes an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. In 2010, Elena Kagan ’81 becomes an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

IMAGE: DAILY PRINCETONIAN


you

In 2017, you are a student at Princeton. What will you do to change the course of history?